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Indoor Environmental Quality

Trapped With Contaminants

By | HVAC, Indoor Air Quality, Indoor Environmental Quality, Radon | No Comments

Save on the Energy Bill or Save on Your Health Bill?

New homes, schools, office buildings, and more are being built as airtight as possible in an effort to save on energy, and to be able to better control the indoor environment.

But if the indoor environment isn’t properly controlled, contaminants such as formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), and radon can build up and circulate throughout the house.

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Don’t Let Melting Snow Seep into Your Basement

By | Indoor Environmental Quality | No Comments

Rain is a well-known enemy of a basement. Downpours can lead to floods in minutes, causing a wet basement, and in turn, can create an ideal environment for mold to grow.

But as we head into the colder months, much of that rain won’t be rain anymore and instead will be pure white fluffy snow!

Melting snow is just as much of a menace as rain.

The rule of thumb is that each 10 inches of snow, melted, would produce one inch of water. That’s 2,715 gallons of water per acre. But the actual amount can vary significantly depending on the consistency of the snow. Heavy, wet snow has a very high water content. 4 or 5 inches of that snow can contain about one inch of water, while it may take 20 inches of dry, powdery snow to equal one inch of water.

So even a minor snow melt can deposit thousands of gallons of water around the foundation of your house.

Don’t get caught off-guard by melting snow and wet basement!

Chemical Management for Schools

By | Indoor Environmental Quality, Safety | No Comments

Improper chemical management poses health and safety risks to everyone in schools. While anyone can be effected, health, learning, and behavior risks to students are of primary concern. Children are more vulnerable than adults to chemical hazards because their bodies are still developing.

Health risks aren’t the only risks involved with improper chemical management in schools.

The expenses of improper chemical management can be hundreds of thousands of dollars or more for just a single school. Spills and other incidents are not only costly, but pose potential liabilities and lawsuits. Improper chemical waste management can result in fines, increased insurance premiums, and inflict damage upon the environment. If chemicals contaminate sanitary sewer lines or on-site waste treatment systems, rivers, streams, and groundwater can be poisoned. Spills to the ground can result in considerable remediation costs. While water is first and foremost thought of after a chemical spill, spills can also pollute the air.

Improper chemical management doesn’t only effect people physically.

It only takes one chemical incident to break the trust with the community. School incidents can lead to increased parental and community concern, and embarrassment to the school and school district. This in turn can create negative publicity both locally and nationally.

Lastly, improper chemical management can result in school closures, and that results in a loss of valuable education.

 

Hazardous chemicals aren’t always just laboratory chemicals for science.

Other examples are:

  • Art supplies – paints, stains, inks, glazes, photo processing chemicals
  • Cleaning products, pesticides, fertilizers, and de-icers
  • Solvents, fuels, degreasers, lubricants, oils, antifreeze, adhesives
  • Water treatment chemicals for drinking water and swimming

 

One of the best ways to avoid workplace confusion and prevent chemical incidents is to establish a Global Harmonization System (GHS). These include identifications of all chemicals present in the school, information on proper labeling and storage, potential hazards, and safety procedures for the use, transport, and disposal of chemicals. This chemical inventory also lists the quantities and locations that can be used to reduce the costs when purchasing so no excess chemicals are ordered. Perhaps most importantly, a GHS serves as a reference for school and emergency personnel in the event of an emergency caused by a chemical.

Indoor Environmental Assessments

By | Indoor Air Quality, Indoor Environmental Quality | No Comments

Strange Odor? Building Occupants Fatigued in the Afternoon?

Proper building operations and routine maintenance are critical to ensuring healthy indoor air quality (IAQ). Building managers are often the first person building occupants turn to with a problem. The top three sources of IAQ problems are inadequate ventilation, contamination from inside the building, and contamination from outside the building.

Improve the balance between facility energy efficiency and occupant health, comfort and productivity. With an Indoor Environmental Quality Assessment, potential IAQ issues can be identified before they become problems.

An Indoor Environmental Quality Assessment includes comprehensive testing for elevated levels of mold spores, radon gas, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ozone, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), as well as much more!

Our Assessment also includes readings of your facility’s relative humidity which is one of the largest contributing factors to poor health!

This testing is simultaneous measurement of IAQ indicators meaning it can be done in one day.