Category

Radon

Passive Radon Control Systems

By | Radon | No Comments
While there is no safe level of radon, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that anything above 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) should be reduced.

A passive sub-slab depressurization system is designed to achieve lower sub-slab air pressure relative to indoor air pressure by use of a vent pipe routed through the conditioned space of a building and connecting the sub-slab area with outdoor air. Read More

Radon in New Design

By | Radon, Renovation | No Comments
It seems like new construction is popping up everywhere. New office buildings, new housing developments etc.…While designing these structures, professionals are taking into account potential problems they can physically see such as sloping land or nearby water.

But is anyone thinking about Radon?

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Trapped With Contaminants

By | HVAC, Indoor Air Quality, Indoor Environmental Quality, Radon | No Comments

Save on the Energy Bill or Save on Your Health Bill?

New homes, schools, office buildings, and more are being built as airtight as possible in an effort to save on energy, and to be able to better control the indoor environment.

But if the indoor environment isn’t properly controlled, contaminants such as formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), and radon can build up and circulate throughout the house.

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Radon & Lung Cancer

By | Radon | No Comments
Lung cancer kills thousands of people every year. The survival rate is one of the lowest for those with cancer. From the time of diagnosis, only 11-15% of those afflicted will live beyond five years.

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. Radon is the second leading cause, but the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. Secondhand smoke is the third leading cause.

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An Invisible Cause of Lung Cancer

By | Baxter Group, Inc., Indoor Air Quality, Radon | No Comments

A cancer-causing radioactive gas that comes from the soil and can seep into any type of building- house, office, school, hospital, etc.…It can get in through cracks in solid floors and walls, construction joints, gaps in suspended floors and around service pipes, cavities inside walls and even in the water supply.

It is found all over the United States, but areas are broken into three zones measured in picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L).

  • Zone 1 Highest Potential (greater than 4 pCi/L)
  • Zone 2 Moderate Potential (from 2 to 4 pCi/L)
  • Zone 3 Low Potential (less than 2 pCi/L)

No level of radon is safe, but anything above 4 pCi/L needs to be mitigated. Franklin County, PA and the immediate surrounding counties are all in Zone 1 meaning those counties have the highest radon exposure risk.

 

However, if your next-door neighbor’s house tests at 27 pCi/L, your home could test at 36 pCi/L or it could test 2 pCi/L. Many factors play a part in radon levels. The building structure, the wind, how much uranium is in the soil, rocks or water etc…

 

Just because the surrounding area tests high doesn’t mean your house will test high.

 

But the only way to know is to test.