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Wet Basements

November’s Breathe Healthy Initiative Topic: Wet Basements and Crawlspaces

By | Basement Dewatering, Basement Water Control, Mold, Wet Basements | No Comments

IS YOUR BASEMENT or CRAWLSPACE suffering from overexposure to moisture?

In the case where a crawlspace has been infiltrated with water over a period of 12 hours or longer, mold remediation is crucial to bring the area back to a safe condition prior to any waterproofing or mitigation.

Most likely, whether visible or not, after an area has remained damp or moist for a period of time, a mold contamination may exist. Remember mold remediation is futile unless the source of the moisture has been addressed. Otherwise, the next high humidity, moisture, or water event will bring the mold right back.

Addressing water-control / moisture-control and mold go hand-in-hand.

To learn more, to join our BREATHE HEALTHY Initiative, or to request a copy of our BREATHE HEALTHY e-book, visit baxtergroupinc.com/healthy.

November’s Breathe Healthy Initiative Topic: Wet Basements and Crawlspaces

By | Basement Dewatering, Basement Water Control, Mold, Wet Basements | No Comments

DEHUMIDIFIER IS YOUR BASEMENT’S BEST FRIEND!

A proper dehumidification system will include a system to capture the water produced and exhaust it to the outside so there is no dependence of building occupants or maintenance personnel to empty the dehumidifier.

Between vacations and distractions, the chances are that there would be times when the dehumidifier was not emptied in a timely fashion. Such events would lead to high humidity episodes, which leads to opportunities for mold growth.

To learn more, to join our BREATHE HEALTHY Initiative, or to request a copy of our BREATHE HEALTHY e-book, visit baxtergroupinc.com/healthy.

SO, WE’VE GOT A WET BASEMENT or CRAWLSPACE! WHERE DO WE START? – PART I

By | Basement Dewatering, Basement Water Control, Mold, Wet Basements | No Comments

Having a full assessment is the wisest move.  Stories are rampant of building owners who have paid for extensive and expensive waterproofing systems … only to find that by making other water-control repairs they could have avoided installation of such a system.

Needed gutter repairs is a great example:  The rainwater pours off the roof, around and through the deteriorating gutter system, down the foundation wall of the building and right into the newly installed French drains.  However, if the gutters had been repaired, the need for the French drains would have been eliminated.

In performing a full assessment, all sources of water are being identified, whether they are coming from landscaping issues, issues with the exterior systems of the building, or issues with the interior systems of the building.

To learn more, to join our BREATHE HEALTHY Initiative, or to request a copy of our BREATHE HEALTHY e-book, visit baxtergroupinc.com/healthy.

November’s Breathe Healthy Initiative Topic: Wet Basements and Crawlspaces

By | Basement Dewatering, Basement Water Control, Baxter Group, Inc., Home Improvement, Wet Basements | No Comments

Warning signs that indicate a moisture problem exists in a basement or crawl space should be followed by a full assessment.

WET ALERTS include:

  • Humidity over 60%, which may indicate moisture exists but the source may be hidden … a leaking pipe, water lying against the exterior walls, water entering cracks in walls.
  • Condensation on structural components or other components within the space, which may indicate that warm moist air is entering the cooled area.
  • Peeling paint, which may indicate water is seeping under the paint and causing it to bubble.
  • Cracked walls, which may indicate that severe pressure is occurring under the floor or behind the wall. This could lead to structural damage as well.
  • Cracked walls, which may indicate that the concrete was not allowed to cure properly or that pockets of air were not properly removed during the initial installation of the foundation. Water will then force its way through the wall.
  • A coating of efflorescense on the wall, which indicates that moisture may be seeping through the wall. Efflorescense is the salt and chemical residue from either the soil or concrete wall.
  • Buckling or bowed-in walls, which may indicate severe pressure behind the wall. It may have originally been hydrostatic pressure or water pressure, but over time it could transition to the pressure coming from the weight of the soil pressing against the foundation walls.
  • Mold, which may indicate high-humidity events or moisture events.
  • Puddles, which may indicate that the footings are too narrow or not laid deep enough, causing them to be susceptible to movement caused by soil erosion.

Although multiple signs seem to become evident all at once, quite often the problems were gradual and unnoticed.  Water problems can also originate because of one event such as local dynamiting, a storm that saturates the ground, or recent changes to landscaping.  All these events can also change the composition of the ground around the basement or crawl space creating new water entry paths.

To learn more, to join our BREATHE HEALTHY Initiative, or to request a copy of our BREATHE HEALTHY e-book, visit baxtergroupinc.com/healthy.

November’s Breathe Healthy Initiative Topic: Wet Basements and Crawlspaces

By | Basement Dewatering, Basement Water Control, Mold, Wet Basements | No Comments

Maintaining the overall health of a basement or crawlspace is crucial to the health of a building.  The structural components of a building are equivalent to the bone system of our body – the basement or crawlspace is equivalent to the pelvis and lower back. When the pelvis or lower back are injured or deteriorating, it affects the body’s overall health. The same is true with a basement and crawlspaces.

This fact has been confirmed by tracer gas studies, which documented that a building’s crawlspace or basement communicates with the occupied spaces above. Approximately 40% of the air in our buildings originates from these areas.

To learn more, to join our BREATHE HEALTHY Initiative, or to request a copy of our BREATHE HEALTHY e-book, visit baxtergroupinc.com/healthy.

Prevent a Wet Basement

By | Wet Basements | No Comments
It’s called April Showers for a reason. The environment welcomes the surplus of warm rain, but a homeowner with cracks in their basement isn’t so welcoming.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), April 2017 was the second wettest April in the 123-year period of record. Above-average precipitation was observed across a large portion of the nation, including much-above-average precipitation in the Mid-Atlantic. Even record precipitation was observed in parts of the Mid-Atlantic.

A wet basement can cause structural damage, create mold and mildew problems, and ruin materials or items stored in the space.

Just HOW does water get into your basement? Read More

Signs of Water Leakage

By | Home Improvement, Wet Basements | No Comments

Dampness.

A musty odor.

Cracks on the walls or floors.

Discoloration or white powder on the walls.

 

Does this describe your basement?

 

These are signs of water leakage and excessive humidity.

One of the most common areas where water seeps into basements is where the basement wall meets the floor. The main cause of this water seepage is called Hydrostatic water pressure. This pressure can force water into a seam or weak point in the foundation, primarily the cold joint, where different pours of concrete meet. Because wet concrete will not bond to dry concrete, this creates spaces.

There’s a way to control that Hydrostatic water pressure. It is a simple vinyl baseboard which is bonded to the floor and sits next to the wall. In a finished home, it takes the place of baseboard trim.

This system:

1.  Affordable

2.  Non-invasive

3.  Can be installed in finished and non-finished homes.

4.  Can be painted.

5.  Only deals with seepage that enters the structure so humidity levels are not increased.

6.  Can easily be sealed if radon gas is a concern or problem.

 

The epoxy used is stronger than concrete.

It will:

1.  NOT break down over time.

2.  Set up in wet environments. Already have a wet basement? Doesn’t matter! You don’t have to wait until your basement is dry to fix it.